Feminism | Posted by Farha Khalidi on 07/26/2017

How This Youth Council Is Helping Queer Muslims

Urooj Arshad

Urooj Arshad

Our government has a way of minimizing its destructive influence on the minorities of this nation by convincing us that we’re the problem—that we’re all out to get each other and everyone else—so we lose focus on the systemic oppression inflicted upon us by our highest-ranking officials and start to point fingers at each other, until we reach mutually assured destruction.

Take, for instance, the Muslim and LGBTQ+ communities in the United States. Both of these communities are marginalized in our conservative Christian society, and as such are pitted against each other. Urooj Arshad, founder of the Muslim Youth Leadership Council, told the FBomb that she believes the U.S. government is “bigoted towards the LGBT and Muslim communities, but tries to use the LGBT community as a proxy …

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Feminism | Posted by Farha Khalidi on 06/23/2017

The Invisibility of Muslim Girls and Women Must End

Art by @nerdybrownkid

Art by @nerdybrownkid

This past week, a teenage girl identified as Nabra Hassanen was brutally murdered. She was attacked on her way home—assaulted by a man with a gun, beaten with a metal bat, and discarded into a body of water. Before she was attacked,  Hassanen was leaving her mosque, a Muslim place of worship, during the week of Ramadan, and wearing her hijab. What should be mundane details about this young women instead suggest that Nabra’s murder was a hate crime and that her perpetrator’s actions and beliefs were rooted in sheer ignorance and resentment.

In this particular, tragic instance, one Muslim girl was killed. But this crime is bigger than Hassanen alone: it is a threat to an entire religion, particularly its women.

Muslim girls and women …

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Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 06/23/2015

Does That T-shirt Match Her Headscarf?

Samantha Elauf

Samantha Elauf

In 2008, 17-year-old Samantha Elauf was denied a job at a Tulsa, Oklahoma Abercrombie Kids store. Why? The retailer believed her hijab did not comply with their “look policy.” Her headscarf was apparently an immediate indicator that she did not align with the “East Coast collegiate image” Abercrombie cultivates in its branding, the New York Times reported. Elauf was effectively informed that her Muslim identity was un-American.

Elauf fought this notion. She brought her story to the Council on American Islamic Relations, which then brought it to the attention of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The EEOC sued Abercrombie & Fitch on Elauf’s behalf and the case eventually made it to the Supreme Court. In appellate court, Abercrombie’s defense argued that Elauf had not explicitly stated in …

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