Awareness | Posted by Julie Graves on 08/10/2017

On Trump’s Transgender Military Ban

The ban is discriminatory.

The ban is discriminatory.

Historically, changes in military policies have been indicative of broader fights for social change in America. For example, the military’s desegregation in 1948 reflected the Civil Rights movement’s progress made around racial discrimination against African Americans, and the 2011 repeal of “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell,” a policy that banned openly gay citizens from serving in the military, reflected the progress the LGBT movement had made (in fact, gay marriage was legalized soon after). So in the wake of this progress, it was all the more upsetting when Trump declared a ban on transgender people serving in the military last Wednesday.

Though Trump claimed to have consulted with top military officials about this ban, General Joseph Dunford stated that he would not remove transgender people from the …

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Feminism | Posted by Kayleigh Bolingbroke on 01/18/2017

Remembering George Michael, A Role Model For Healthy Masculinity

George Michael

To say 2016 was a depressing year is a total understatement. Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, an astonishing number of abortion bans were passed, and the deaths of celebrities and everyday people alike were broadcast on news channels on what seemed like a daily basis. But George Michael’s death on Christmas Day felt like a particularly cruelly ironic death in what was ultimately an exemplar year for toxic masculinity. While we gained a president who bragged about sexual assault and has clearly bought into the utmost virulent masculinity standards, we lost an icon who spent years encouraging everybody to reflect on stereotypical masculinity.

From his music to the clothes he wore and flamboyant persona he adopted, Michael refused to embody a stereotypical idea of masculinity. His …

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Feminism | Posted by Crystal O on 08/22/2016

How I Fit Into Mainstream Pride Events As A Queer Black Woman

Pride

I realized that I wasn’t straight when I was about 15 years old. Soon after, I got involved with my high school’s Gay-Straight Alliance. During one of the club’s meetings, the steering committee chair of an organization called PFLAG (Parents, Friends, and Families of Lesbians of Gays) joined us as a guest speaker. That day proved to be a pivotal one for me. After the committee chair spoke, I attended a PFLAG meeting and became a member of their youth group: Rainbow Youth and Allies. I am now proud to facilitate this group.

Actually coming out, however, was a process that started after I had begun attending PFLAG. I was fairly open about my sexuality at school and was not shy to stand up for myself and for the …

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