Awareness | Posted by Vicki S on 08/14/2017

Ending The Victimization Of Alleged Perpetrators Of Assault

Emma Sulkowicz performing 'Mattress Project'

Emma Sulkowicz performing ‘Mattress Project’

In July of this year, Columbia University settled alleged rapist Paul Nungesser’s lawsuit against the school for gender-based discrimination. Nungesser was accused of raping then-fellow Columbia student Emma Sulkowicz, who gained attention for her 2014 performance-art piece Mattress Performance (Carry That Weight).

Although Sulkowicz’s project itself gained a lot of media attention, the story behind it and her motivations for doing it were less popularized. Sulkowicz created Mattress Performance following Columbia University’s decision to not hold Nungesser responsible for sexually assaulting her. Sulkowicz had first gone to Columbia’s Office of Gender-Based and Sexual Misconduct and reported her assault on April 13, 2013 after learning that two other women had also allegedly been assaulted by the same person who she said raped her on the …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Graves on 03/10/2017

An Interview With Award-Winning Teen Activist Filmmaker Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger is a junior in high school from Houston, Texas. She also happens to be an award-winning filmmaker who has her own production company, JOM Productions. Barger’s short film, “Milky White // Rosy Petals,” has been shown at three film festivals around the U.S.; she won Best Student Film at the Austin Revolution Film Festival; and she was nominated for the Best Youth Filmmaker at the Long Beach Indie International Film Festival.

In light of recent political controversies surrounding President Donald Trump, Barger has begun to approach filmmaking from a perspective of political activism. I asked her about how film can be an activist tool, and how she sees political activism evolving among our generation.

This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.

Julie Graves: How

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 02/8/2017

Bridging The Divide

UC Berkeley

I dressed up as Donald Trump for Halloween in 2015. My costume was inspired by my disbelief that a “sexy Donald Trump” costume was being sold on the Internet. Instead of supporting the company that had (seemingly earnestly) created that costume, I decided to parody the idea by making my own. I borrowed my friend’s suit jacket and tie, bought a blond wig, and wrote “Make America Great Again” in black sharpie on a generic red baseball cap.  My friend dressed up as Melania Trump: She wore a tight dress, high heels, fake eyelashes, and curled her hair.  I posted a photo taken of our costumes on Instagram, complete with what I saw as a fitting Trump quote: “You know, it doesn’t really matter what [the media] writes

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Feminism | Posted by Angela Liu on 01/27/2017

7 Things To Rally Around To Support Feminism In 2017

Credit: Women's March on Washington

Credit: Women’s March on Washington

2016 was a year of political turmoil, heartbreaking losses, and global discord. 2017 is poised to be another year of great change — in fact, plenty of damage has already been done: Trump advanced the DAPL and Keystone Pipelines, expanded the Global Gag Rule, and moved to block refugees entry to the U.S. (just to name a few things). But while it’s important to focus on resisting these attacks, we must also recognize the positive forces that still exist and need support now more than ever. Here are just a few.

The power of civilian activism: The Women’s March on Washington, as well marches around the nation and world, recently drew millions of people. As we head into 2017, let’s keep this dynamic, …

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Feminism | Posted by Grace Wong on 01/25/2017

After Marching

Signs from the Women's March

Signs from the Women’s March

I said I wouldn’t march. In fact, I promised myself I had gotten all the marching out of my system. The day after the election, I protested Donald Trump’s presidency — protests that turned to riots. I therefore came to the conclusion in November that protesting Trump was not the solution. Yet at 6:00 o’clock on Saturday morning, I found myself on the floor of an LA hotel room, scrambling to make a poster that read: “My body. My choice. My country. My voice.”

I had initially considered marching. As a self-identifying feminist, I understood the importance of fighting for women’s rights. As a young woman of color, I understood the importance of amending systems rife with racism. As a climate-enthusiast, I understood the …

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Feminism | Posted by Mankaprr Conteh on 01/23/2017

What I Witnessed At The Women’s March

Lakeisha Robinson at the March

Lakeisha Robinson at the March

Janelle Monáe took the Women’s March on Washington stage with a box office hit under her belt, hope for unity among the hundreds of thousands of women before her in her heart, and what should have been a simple request of those women on her lips.

As she performed her anthemic protest song “Hell You Talmbout,” Monáe would call the name of Sandra Bland, a young black activist who suspiciously, supposedly took her own life while in police custody.

“Say her name,” were the words Monáe charged the audience to respond with, invoking the African American Policy Forum’s 2015 campaign that recognized police violence against black women.

“Sandra Bland!” she yelled.

“No!” pockets of white women around me yelled in response.

We …

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Feminism | Posted by Virginia Jiang on 01/20/2017

Why I March

Are you going to March?

Are you going to March?

I remember the first time I was called a fag.

It was on a crisp fall day. I was walking to class. A man passed by me. It was casual, almost off-hand, like a bigoted stutter. It wasn’t the first time I had heard the word, but it was the first time it felt pointed, chiseled into the heart of my being. It was two days after the 2016 election.

Before that day, I had never felt that sense of otherness – the feeling that I was somehow alien to my homeland. Because though I am a queer woman of color, I had never before felt that my identities could fuel such casual enmity.

Maybe that was naïve of me, but we do live in …

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Creative | Posted by Vicki S on 09/19/2016

Meet The Teen Artist Tackling Everyday Sexism In Her Work

19-year-old Röra Blue first caught the Internet’s attention with her jarringly honest photo series, “The Unsent Project.” The project, which has already accumulated thousands of submissions, is a collection of unsent text messages to first loves. First launched on Tumblr, users can now submit their unsent texts directly through Röra’s website: They can choose the color of their message, type their unspoken words to first significant others, and can then print them into stickers.

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

Recently, Röra has focused her attention on a new, more feminist-minded project: “Handle With Care.

According to Röra’s website, “Handle With Care” seeks to capture sexist comments — literally. Her photos asks viewers to pay attention to sexism by forcing them to engage with and critique many …

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