Feminism | Posted by Roberta Nin Feliz on 08/9/2017

The Adultification Of Black Girls

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Black girls are seen as older and less innocent than their white counterparts

The results of a recently published Georgetown Law study that found Black girls experience “adultification”—or are seen as older and less innocent than their white counterparts—might be surprising to some, but certainly not to those in the Black community. While this study isn’t the first to validate the inequitable experiences of Black women or Blackness in general, this study reflects the specific experiences of Black girls.

Many black girls are familiar with being seen as more adult than our peers. Hearing comments like being told to “cover up” when I was going through puberty made me feel like I was older and more mature than my age. That perception of maturity gave me an awareness about …

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Feminism | Posted by Karla Majdancic on 08/7/2017

DACA Might Be At Risk. Here’s What That Means.

Support DACA.

After immigrant youth spent years relentlessly organizing and protesting against U.S. deportation laws, President Obama signed an executive order called Deferred Action for Children Act (DACA) in 2012. DACA was created to provide temporary deportation relief to eligible undocumented youth who had migrated to the United States as children. But those protected by DACA now fear its rescission due to the current administration’s toxic rhetoric surrounding immigrants—a fear most recently reiterated on July 20, when then-Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly told members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus that the Deferred Action for Children Act might be at risk.

This announcement notably came after the introduction of a bipartisan bill by Senators Durbin and Graham that would “provide Dreamers with a path to citizenship.” But despite the bill’s …

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Feminism | Posted by Farha Khalidi on 07/26/2017

How This Youth Council Is Helping Queer Muslims

Urooj Arshad

Urooj Arshad

Our government has a way of minimizing its destructive influence on the minorities of this nation by convincing us that we’re the problem—that we’re all out to get each other and everyone else—so we lose focus on the systemic oppression inflicted upon us by our highest-ranking officials and start to point fingers at each other, until we reach mutually assured destruction.

Take, for instance, the Muslim and LGBTQ+ communities in the United States. Both of these communities are marginalized in our conservative Christian society, and as such are pitted against each other. Urooj Arshad, founder of the Muslim Youth Leadership Council, told the FBomb that she believes the U.S. government is “bigoted towards the LGBT and Muslim communities, but tries to use the LGBT community as a proxy …

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Awareness | Posted by Kadin Burnett on 05/4/2017

How One Formerly Incarcerated Youth Is Taking On The System

Hernan Carvente

Hernan Carvente

Hernan Carvente was born into an unstable home environment, rife with alcohol and domestic abuse and devoid of any resources that could help him and his family escape these cycles of violence. Carvente was drinking by the age of eight, gang affiliated by 13, and just 16 years old when he was convicted of a violent crime that resulted in four years of incarceration in a maximum-security juvenile facility.

Hernan, like most youths in juvenile detention, had to rely on the facility itself for rehabilitation—a service that would supposedly present the opportunity for incarcerated teens to find the tools and take the measures necessary to remedy the trajectory of their lives. But Brookwood Detention Center, two hours north of New York City, didn’t facilitate an environment for development.…

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Feminism | Posted by Corinne Singer on 04/14/2017

A Love Letter on Disability: Stop Feeling Sorry For Us. Start Fighting For Us.

Stop feeling sorry for us.

Stop feeling sorry for us.

The onset of my disabilities began at 13 and I have been unable to engage in regular physical activities for years. Early on, I braced myself for a lifetime of chronic back dysfunctions compounded by the equally debilitating realities of depression and anxiety. The transition into my status as “disabled” and later to my status as “part-time wheelchair user” has been endlessly complex. I went from having a body that people celebrated—a body that fulfilled cultural obsessions with physical strength and performativity—to having a body that was rejected.

The precise moment at which my body became a “problem” will remain with me forever. It was when my first back specialist informed me that I had fractured multiple parts of my lumbar spine— not because of …

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Feminism | Posted by Kinder L on 03/31/2017

This Isn’t About Leggings

Women should be allowed to wear whatever they want.

United Airlines was thrust into the spotlight this week after a gate agent refused to let two female travelers board an aircraft. Their issue wasn’t concern for passengers’ security or managing inappropriate behavior: The girls were banned from boarding because they were both wearing leggings. United passenger Shannon Watts witnessed the incident at the gate and immediately shared her disappointment to Twitter. “A @united gate agent isn’t letting girls on flight… because spandex is not allowed?” Watts tweeted. The airline quickly found itself in hot water as people—including celebrities such as Patricia Arquette—expressed their disappointment and criticism of the company’s sexist dress code on social media.

United’s dress code is certainly problematic (and ridiculous) in and of itself, but this …

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Feminism | Posted by Virginia Jiang on 01/20/2017

Why I March

Are you going to March?

Are you going to March?

I remember the first time I was called a fag.

It was on a crisp fall day. I was walking to class. A man passed by me. It was casual, almost off-hand, like a bigoted stutter. It wasn’t the first time I had heard the word, but it was the first time it felt pointed, chiseled into the heart of my being. It was two days after the 2016 election.

Before that day, I had never felt that sense of otherness – the feeling that I was somehow alien to my homeland. Because though I am a queer woman of color, I had never before felt that my identities could fuel such casual enmity.

Maybe that was naïve of me, but we do live in …

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Feminism | Posted by Kayleigh Bolingbroke on 01/18/2017

Remembering George Michael, A Role Model For Healthy Masculinity

George Michael

To say 2016 was a depressing year is a total understatement. Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, an astonishing number of abortion bans were passed, and the deaths of celebrities and everyday people alike were broadcast on news channels on what seemed like a daily basis. But George Michael’s death on Christmas Day felt like a particularly cruelly ironic death in what was ultimately an exemplar year for toxic masculinity. While we gained a president who bragged about sexual assault and has clearly bought into the utmost virulent masculinity standards, we lost an icon who spent years encouraging everybody to reflect on stereotypical masculinity.

From his music to the clothes he wore and flamboyant persona he adopted, Michael refused to embody a stereotypical idea of masculinity. His …

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